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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
cut their vacations short, to deal with fiscal cliff negotiations. they have five days to make a deal. and housing continues to be the bright spot in the u.s. economy: home prices post their biggest advance in two years. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! christmas may be over, but the holiday shopping season continues. many consumers hit the malls today to return gifts and buy what they really wanted. and this is the time many gift cards get redeemed. but for retailers, holiday sales so far have been a flop. sales in the two months leading up to christmas, rose just 0.7%, according to mastercard advisors that tracks the numbers. that's way below what the retail industry was predicting. erika miller spoke with retail expert dana telsey and began by asking what happened. >> i think there were a confluence of events, extra long season. hurricane sandy. tragedy in ct. >> none of the events out there were feel good factor events. it was all for consumer morale. >> when you look at the weakness this holiday season, how much of the blame do you put on retailers for not having inspiring merc
an agreement on the fiscal cliff was very, very close. >> we'll continue to work on finding smarter ways to cut spending, but let's not let that hold up protecting americans from the tax hike that will take place in about 10 hours. >> reporter: the deal would raise the top tax rate for individuals making more than $400,000 and couples with more than $450,000 in income. itemized deductions would be limited for individuals making more than $250,000 and couples making more than $300,000. the estate tax would rise to 40%. emergency unemployment benefits would be extended for another year. the alternative minimum tax would be adjusted for inflation permanently. and, in an effort to boost the economy, small businesses would be eligible for another year of bonus depreciation when they buy equipment. the big hang up is what to do about the sequester-- $110 billion in automatic spending cuts in defense and domestic programs that begin at midnight. democrats want to postpone the cuts for a year or more. republicans for just a few months. >> i think there are some republicans who believe there is no other
is lifted. >> one area you would like thei. that is a fiscal cliff area. >> closed american bond fundsaee leveraged and we think the dividends are going to be cut and there is a risk we would just avoid them. >> do you own any of theserecom? >> for our discretionaryaccounte closed end accounts and the herzfeld caribbean accounts olds all of the those we spoke of. >> susie: thank you very much tom. or our market monitor tomorrow herzfeld. coming up on monday on "n.b.r." we'll be monitoring those fiscal cliff negotiations, and we'll have news and analysis. we'll also a look back at the year in stocks, and s&p's sam stovall joins us to pre-view what's next for the markets in the year ahead. it could be one of the biggest trends in business next year: companies setting aside time for their employees to play. ruben ramirez explains. >> reporter: it may be hard to remember those hot summer days on the playground. the freedom to let your mind wander. how times have changed. as companies slashed jobs during the great recession worker productivity surged, today, many people are doing the job multi
-- if not resolving the fiscal cliff, at least trying to avoid the blame. darren gersh, nbr, washington. >> susie: going over the fiscal cliff will not only have an impact on the national level, it will also hit states and eventually cities. if lawmakers fail to reach a deal before january 1, the cliff's across the board spending cuts and tax increases will impact how much money states get from the federal government. ruben ramirez reports from washington. >> reporter: we all know the numbers. failing to reach a deal by january 1 will result in $109 billion in automatic cuts to federal spending. and while that's a big number, what matters most to states and municipalities is the small print, detailing just where those cuts will happen. and standard & poors' gabe pettek says those details could still be months away. >> even if the policymakers in washington, d.c., resolve the immediate issue before january 1 or shortly thereafter, we think there are going to be several details related to the administration of tax policy and the way the federal government spends money that will have an important ef
push to prevent the economy from falling over the fiscal cliff next week. no specific bill is on the schedule in the senate or the house, and house republicans haven't yet called their members back to washington. and hopes for a deal by the december 31 deadline are fading. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: the odds of avoiding the fiscal cliff did not get any better over the holiday. staff discussions continue, but there were few signs much, if anything has been accomplished. the house isn't even scheduled to return to washington yet, leaving it up to the senate to act. >> this is a senate that is incredibly divided, hopelessly partisan, requires 60 votes to do anything and somehow, we are going to be relying on them to in five days, come up with a compromise which is acceptable where a compromise wasn't acceptable in four years. >> reporter: it now looks like some kind of fall over the cliff is the likeliest scenario. and depending on how long it lasts, it could signal a prolonged fight over the debt limit that could spook markets again in february. >> the republicans are
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)